Health and Wellness

Health and Wellness

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Lead Hazards Lead Hazards

Improving Environmental Health in Saint Louis County


 

Healthy Homes Lead Poisoning Prevention Program | What is a Healthy Home?

Lead Poisoning Prevention | Lead Protect Your Family

Lead Law - Saint Louis Area | Lead - EPA Pamphlets


 

Where lead is found

In general, the older your home, the more likely it has lead-based paint.


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  • Paint. Many homes built before 1978 have lead-based paint. The federal government banned lead-based paint from housing in 1978. Some states stopped its use even earlier. Lead can be found:

  • In homes in the city, country, or suburbs.
  • In apartments, single-family homes, and both private and public housing.
  • Inside and outside of the house.
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  • In soil around a home. Soil can pick up lead from exterior paint, or other sources such as past use of leaded gas in cars, and children playing in yards can ingest or inhale lead dust.

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  • Household dust. Dust can pick up lead from deteriorating lead-based paint or from soil tracked into a home.

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  • Drinking water. Your home might have plumbing with lead or lead solder. Call your local health department or water supplier to find out about testing your water. You cannot see, smell or taste lead, and boiling your water will not get rid of lead. If you think your plumbing might have lead in it:

  • Use only cold water for drinking and cooking.
  • Run water for 15 to 30 seconds before drinking it, especially if you have not used your water for a     few hours.
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  • The job. If you work with lead, you could bring it home on your hands or clothes. Shower and change clothes before coming home. Launder your work clothes separately from the rest of your family's clothes.

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  • Old painted toys and furniture.

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  • Food and liquids stored in lead crystal or lead-glazed pottery or porcelain. Food can become contaminated because lead can leach in from these containers.

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  • Lead smelters or other industries that release lead into the air.

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  • Hobbies that use lead, such as making pottery or stained glass, or refinishing furniture.

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  • Folk remedies that contain lead, such as "greta" and "azarcon" used to treat an upset stomach.


    Where lead is likely to be a hazard

    Lead from paint chips, which you can see, and lead dust, which you can't always see, can be serious hazards.


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  • Peeling, chipping, chalking, or cracking lead-based paint is a hazard and needs immediate attention.

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  • Lead-based paint may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear-and-tear. These areas include:

  • Windows and window sills.
  • Doors and door frames.
  • Stairs, railings, and banisters.
  • Porches and fences.

  • Note: Lead-based paint that is in good condition is usually not a hazard.


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  • Lead dust can form when lead-based paint is dry scraped, dry sanded, or heated. Dust also forms when painted surfaces bump or rub together. Lead chips and dust can get on surfaces and objects that people touch. Settled lead dust can re-enter the air when people vacuum, sweep or walk through it.

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  • Lead in soil can be a hazard when children play in bare soil or when people bring soil into the house on their shoes. Contact the National Lead Information Center (NLIC) to find out about testing soil for lead.


    How to check your family and home for lead

    Just knowing that a home has lead-based paint may not tell you if there is a hazard.


    To reduce your child's exposure to lead, get your child checked, have your home tested (especially if your home has paint in poor condition and was built before 1978), and fix any hazards you may have.


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  • Your family

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  • Children's blood lead levels tend to increase rapidly from 6 to 12 months of age, and tend to peak at 18 to 24 months of age.

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  • Consult your doctor for advice on testing your children. A simple blood test can detect high levels of lead. Blood tests are important for:

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  • Children at ages one and two.

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  • Children and other family members who have been exposed to high levels of lead.

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  • Children who should be tested under your state or local health screening plan.

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  • Your doctor can explain what the test results mean and if more testing will be needed.

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  • Your home

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  • You can get your home checked in one of two ways, or both

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  • A paint inspection tells you the lead content of every different type of painted surface in your home. It won't tell you whether the paint is a hazard or how you should deal with it.

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  • A risk assessment tells you if there are any sources of serious lead exposure (such as peeling paint and lead dust). It also tells you what actions to take to address these hazards.

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  • Have qualified professionals do the work. There are standards in place for certifying lead-based paint professionals to ensure the work is done safely, reliably, and effectively. Contact the National Lead Information Center (NLIC) for a list of contacts in your area.

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  • Trained professionals use a range of methods when checking your home, including:

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  • Visual inspection of paint condition and location.

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  • A portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) machine.

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  • Lab tests of paint samples.

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  • Surface dust tests


    Note: Home test kits for lead are available, but studies suggest that they are not always accurate. Consumers should not rely on these tests before doing renovations or to assure safety.