COVID-19 Banner

Changes to County Services

Click Here for more information on changes to County services and events due to COVID-19.

Click Here for information on services and resources for COVID-19.

Click Here to Report Violations of County Stay at Home Order.

Click Here to become a COVID-19 Health Volunteer.

Click Here to view COVID19 Statistics and Education.

 
Dr. Sam Page COVID-19 Presentation to the County Council
County Executive Sam Page delivers County Council Remarks

Drs. Sam and Jenny Page share a message

County Executive Dr. Page is asking medical professionals to volunteer their time.
A Message from the County Executive
Stay at Home Order
Restaurants Still Open and Need of Community Support
Places of Public Accommodation Executive Order Explained
Limits on Places of Public Accommodation

County Executive Sam Page signed Executive Order No. 13 today requiring all restaurants and bars in St. Louis County to institute social distancing measures that can limit the spread of COVID-19.

Starting today, all businesses that offer food or beverages for on-premises consumption must implement social distancing measures. Social distancing measures include reducing the number of employees and customers in one room.

Starting by 12:01 a.m. on March 20, all restaurants and bars must start serving customers only through delivery, carry-out, or a drive-through.

Limits on Places of Public Accomodation - County Executive Order 13

Executive Order Explained

Please note that the Executive Order referenced in this video has been amended to forbid gatherings of 50 or more people.

Slow the Spread of COVID-19

St. Louis County Department of Public Health's recommended preventative actions required to help slow the spread of COVID-19:

  • Those feeling ill should stay home to protect others in the community.
  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

People at higher risk include those:

  • Over 60 years of age
  • With underlying health conditions including include heart disease, lung disease, or diabetes
  • With weakened immune systems
  • Who are pregnant

Coronavirus News & Information from the St. Louis County Executive & Department of Public Health

April 9, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Stay and Pray

This is an important time for people of many faiths. The way we will have to celebrate Easter and Passover will be different this year, but honoring these traditions are no less important. We all have a role to play in protecting those we share our homes with, those we share our places of worship with, and those we share our communities with.

We can:

  • Take advantage of the ability to participate in services that are available online or on television.
  • Continue family traditions through video chat or phone calls.
  • Cook traditional foods to enjoy the familiar tastes and smells of the holiday.
  • Celebrate in person with those that live with us.

What we should avoid doing:

  • Attending any in-person worship service.
  • Congregating in public areas.
  • Inviting others to celebrate at our home.
  • Attending a celebration outside of our homes.

Text Message Alerts

St. Louis County continues to leverage technology to inform and educate as many people as possible to limit the impact COVID-19 will have on our region. As a reminder, text message alerts are available. Messages are only disseminated during reasonable hours of the day and the content is focused on the most important topics and/or services.

To sign up for them, text: STLOUISCOALERT to 67283. To stop receiving alerts, text: STOP STLOUISCOALERT to 67283.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


April 8, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

National Guard Assistance

The Missouri National Guard will be arriving in our area soon. Today, the St. Louis County Executive’s Office, in partnership with the Department of Public Health (DPH), the St. Louis County Police Department’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), and local hospitals, requested the assistance of the National Guard in the COVID-19 response. The duties of the Guard will include support staffing at testing sites, medical buildings, and other facilities at this time. Their attention will be focused on securing and supporting. The Guard is not here for any enforcement action of the Stay at Home Orders.

Substance Abuse During a Pandemic

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. Some of our friends and family members that might be more susceptible to the increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs may need more assistance. Those that have support networks based on interacting with others, peer groups, and meetings will have to identify and utilize other options as we respond to this pandemic. There are many service-providers that are providing valuable and free support online.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


April 7, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Food Need

The St. Louis County Department of Human Services (DHS) is aware of the food needs of the region that COVID-19 has amplified, especially as other providers are limited in what they can offer and the duration they can do so. DHS is working with many partners throughout the region, including the Regional Response Team, school districts, and Food Bank. DHS is evaluating the best options available to provide the uninterrupted, equitable distribution of food for those in need.

St. Louis County Library and Operation Food Search has been providing drive-thru food pick-up for children since March 30th. Participating branches are providing two shelf-stable breakfasts and two lunches on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, while supplies last. Further information can be found here.

An additional list of food resources can be found here.

Mental Health During a Pandemic

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. Fear and anxiety caused by this pandemic can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. How someone responds to the outbreak can depend on their background, the things that make them different from other people, and the community they live in. That stress can be displayed in the following ways:

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Worsening of mental health conditions
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

If someone is feeling overwhelmed with emotions like sadness, depression, or anxiety, or feel like they might want to harm themselves or others, contact one of the following:

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


April 6, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Immediate Need for Cloth Masks

Due to the national and global span of the pandemic, traditional supply chains of personal protective equipment (PPE) are being exhausted. The St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has evaluated its inventory and there is concern that the supply of masks will not be sufficient enough to satisfy the demand required for the duration of the pandemic. DPH is seeking immediate assistance in gathering cloth masks.

The cloth masks will be worn by those serving in supportive and in-direct roles, thereby preserving much needed N-95 masks for the healthcare workers and first responders who must work in direct contact with those confirmed to have COVID-19. The CDC notes that homemade masks are not considered PPE, as their capability to protect health care professionals is unknown, but this option is a better option than no option.

The CDC has directions for making two types of cloth masks, one that does not require sewing and one that does. Both types can be made out of items found in your home. For more information visit: DIY Cloth Face Coverings.

If you or your organization is able to provide cloth masks, please email [email protected].

Caring for Another at Home

Individuals that are caring for family, friends, or other individuals who are suspected of, or have been confirmed by testing to have COVID-19 should follow all of the aforementioned precautions. They should also be monitoring their own health for signs of symptoms. Further measures for care providers include:

  • Understand the orders for the patient that have been provided by the care provider and the department of health. You will be responsible for providing for the patient’s basic needs. Discuss any questions with your health care provider or DPH representative.
  • Do not reuse masks and gloves. Remove them using the following procedure: remove gloves first, wash hands, remove mask, wash hands.
  • Maintain personal hygiene standards to prevent transmission including frequent hand hygiene. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Both you and the patient should wear masks when in the same room.
  • Wash laundry thoroughly. Wear gloves while handling laundry, then throw the gloves away, and wash hands when finished.
  • Place all disposable gloves, facemasks, and any other contaminated items in a lined container before disposing of them with other household waste. Wash hands immediately after handling these items.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


April 5, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Treating COVID-19 at Home

Recommended treatment for COVID-19 can begin at home, even without being tested or receiving a negative result. Those experiencing symptoms should assume they are positive and be empowered to take control. They should isolate immediately, as that is the best way to prevent the spread of this illness and avoid exposing others. They should also:

  • Stay at home – Separate living quarters and bathrooms from others and do not share common items such as drinking glasses, dishes, household items, towels, bedding, electronics, or other items with other members in your home.
  • Have no visitors – With the exception of those already living with you, law enforcement, fire department staff, emergency medical personnel, healthcare providers, or DPH staff.
  • Incorporate restrictions in outside activities: do not come within 6 feet of another person, do not use common stairwells, hallways, or elevators to get outside, and do not leave your own property or leasehold.
  • Monitor symptoms – continue to assess for fever (take temperature twice a day), coughing, shortness of breath and other less common symptoms. Contact a healthcare provider/department of health representative for guidance if symptoms worsen. Do not seek care at a medical facility without calling first.
  • Continue to practice preventative measures including hand washing and covering coughs & sneezes.
  • Clean “high-touch” surfaces at least once a day. “High-touch” includes counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, tablets, keyboards, and bedside tables.

Attached is the letter that is being sent to those who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and are awaiting test results.

Metro Transit

The stay at home order is applicable to those utilizing public transit. Individuals should limit trips on Metro Transit to essential trips only, such as essential workers commuting to work or going to the grocery store. Limiting travel is vital to public health.

Metro Transit announced effective today, the indoor areas at the Civic Center, Riverview, North County and Ballas Transit Centers will be closed until further notice. These four Metro Transit Centers will remain open for MetroBus and MetroLink service, but riders will not be able to access the indoor areas at the transit center. This measure is being implemented as part of Metro Transit’s ongoing efforts to minimize potential exposure to riders and employees while continuing to provide critical transportation options for essential workers and necessary trips during the COVID-19 crisis.

Cloth Masks

The CDC recommends the use of cloth masks for those that are looking for alternative ways to protect themselves when going to areas that may prove difficult to practice social distancing, like the grocery store or pharmacy. The use of cloth masks is believed to slow the spread of the virus, while also preserving much needed N-95 masks for healthcare workers and first responders, who must work in direct contact with those confirmed to have COVID-19.

The CDC has directions for making two types of cloth masks, one that does not require sewing and one that does. Both types can be made out of items found in your home. For more information visit: DIY Cloth Face Coverings.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


April 4, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Cloth Masks

The CDC recommends the use of cloth masks for those that are looking for alternative ways to protect themselves when going to areas that may prove difficult to practice social distancing, like the grocery store or pharmacy. The use of cloth masks is believed to slow the spread of the virus, while also preserving much needed N-95 masks for healthcare workers and first responders, who must work in direct contact with those confirmed to have COVID-19.

The CDC has directions for making two types of cloth masks, one that does not require sewing and one that does. Both types can be made out of items found in your home. For more information visit: DIY Cloth Face Coverings.

St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force

Today, St. Louis Regional Health Care Systems launched the St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force. This is a unified effort amongst BJC HealthCare, Mercy, SSM Health, and St. Luke’s Hospital. The goal of this is to coordinate across multiple disciplines, including health care systems, governmental bodies, and public health officials, to work together to provide the best possible care to an influx of patients. The St. Louis County Executive’s Office and St. Louis County Department of Public Health are proud to be a part of this collaboration.

“A unified commitment will save lives,” St. Louis County Executive Dr. Sam Page said. “St. Louis has one of the best healthcare systems in the country. Bringing all of our talent together will help us fight the surge that is coming. This is the most responsible, effective way to lessen the impact.”

No Yard Waste Pick-Up for Some

Yesterday, there was confusion in some communities regarding waste pick-up. If you received a recorded call regarding your Waste Connections service, it was intended to indicate that yard waste collection has been suspended until May. This will allow the resources to adjust to accommodate the large increase in residential waste. Again, this applies to yard waste only and regular trash pick-up and recycling will continue as scheduled.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


 

April 3, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

On 4/2/2020, St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) received notification of a COVID-19 involved death of a 70-79 year old male. The underlying medical conditions, if any, are unknown at this time. This is the sixth death in St. Louis County.

St. Louis County Parks are Closing

To slow the spread of COVID-19, St. Louis County parks will officially close tonight at 8 PM. They will remain closed through at least April 22nd, to remain consistent with the stay at home order.

“This will help us save lives. That’s our top priority,” St. Louis County Executive Dr. Sam Page said. “I had hoped we could keep the parks open but the spread of COVID-19 is too big of a threat to the health of our residents.”

To ensure the public is aware of the park closings, several different steps will be taken. Social media platforms have and will continue to be utilized. A press release was authored and disseminated to the local media on April 2, 2020. Barricades will be placed at park entrances that are not already gated. Electronic message boards will be positioned on streets that lead to entrances of Creve Coeur Lake Park, Jefferson Barracks Park, Lone Elk Park and Grant’s Trail. The county Parks Department will collaborate with Great Rivers Greenway to barricade and provide signage for the trail networks in County parks.

Dashboard

St. Louis County has created a dashboard with information and statistics that is accessible any time at www.stlcorona.com. The dashboard displays cumulative cases, age breakdowns, lives lost, hotline calls, and other pertinent information. [The loss of life will be reflected in the dashboard and individual email notifications will be phased out. Thank you for the patience as we continue to adapt to best handle this evolving pandemic.]

We anticipate adding a map to the dashboard today. That map will detail the breakdown of the spread of COVID-19 and the way it is affecting individual zip codes in St. Louis County. It will depict some areas experiencing more of an impact than others. Attention and resources are being deployed appropriately to address those needs. Zip codes that have fewer cases should not become complacent or disregard the guidelines set forth. A map is attached. Today is the only time it will be included in this update.

It is important to recognize that since March 22, 2020, epidemiological investigations indicate there is clear evidence of community transmission in St. Louis County. Simply put, this is community spread. This should re-new and re-inforce the call for strict adherence to the stay at home order.

Please note, the map is based on statistics that are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available. This is limited to depicting known and confirmed cases.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.



April 2, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

On 4/1/2020, St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) received notification of a COVID-19 involved death of a 50-59 year old male. This is the fifth death in St. Louis County.

Rapid Notification Order

The St. Louis County Department of Public Health’s Rapid Notification Order goes into effect today, April 2, 2020. The order is intended to enhance and accelerate the notification process and minimize confusion. Ultimately, the order will result in DPH being able to save lives while providing the public with the best information available as expeditiously as possible.

As previously noted, DPH will require any laboratory company or healthcare provider who receives a positive test result for COVID-19 to report that finding to DPH immediately, but not later than six hours after notification of the result. Additionally, healthcare providers will be required to report a death, if that death is caused by or from complications of COVID-19, to DPH immediately, but not later than twenty-four hours after the time of such death. Furthermore, negative test results will also have to be submitted immediately, but not later than twenty-four hours after notification of the result.

If both positive and negative results are being reported in a systematic fashion, DPH will eventually have the ability to report the overall amount of tests being administered with confidence. This is a benchmark DPH is striving for.

The Rapid Notification Order is attached and can also be viewed at www.stlcorona.com.

Essential Businesses

The purpose of the Stay at Home Order is to minimize the spread of COVID-19 and has been in effect since March 23, 2020. Businesses that are not essential must comply with the order and those that refuse can expect enforcement action to begin soon.

If businesses that are not essential are continuing their operations, please report these violations of the executive order. This can be done to the St. Louis County Counselor by email to [email protected] or online by visiting www.stlcorona.com.

The Stay at Home Order can be viewed at www.stlcorona.com.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.



April 1, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

On 3/31/2020, St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) received notification of the death of an 80-89 year old man with chronic medical conditions. This is the fourth death in St. Louis County.

Essential Businesses

This is a challenging time for everyone in our community. We continue to encourage our businesses to comply with the Stay at Home Order which went into effect on March 23, 2020. By complying with this order, we can minimize the spread of COVID-19, and therefore limit the economic impact this virus has on our community. Businesses not complying with the Essential Business portion of the Stay at Home Order can expect enforcement action to begin in the near future.

Examples of essential businesses are doctor’s offices, pharmacies, grocery stores, take-out restaurants, gas stations, plumbers and electricians, banks, and laundromats. A more comprehensive list is below.

Businesses that are not essential include, but are not limited to, dine-in restaurants, beauty salons, and gyms.

If businesses that are not essential are continuing their operations, please report these violations of the Executive Order. This can be done to the St. Louis County Counselor by email to [email protected] or online by clicking here.

The complete Stay at Home Order can be found by clicking here.

Essential Businesses include:

  • Health care operations and essential infrastructure
  • Grocery stores, farmers’ markets, farm and produce stands, supermarkets, food banks, and convenience stores. These include stores that sell groceries and also sell other non-grocery products and products necessary to maintaining the safety, sanitation, and essential operation of residences
  • Food and beverage production, processing, and distribution, including farming, ranching, fishing, dairies, creameries, wineries, and breweries
  • Manufacturing companies, distributors, and supply chain companies producing and supplying essential products and services
  • Organizations that provide food, shelter, social services, and other necessities to vulnerable individuals
  • Gas stations and auto supply, auto repair, and bicycle repair facilities
  • Banks, insurance providers, real estate firms, and related financial institutions
  • Hardware stores
  • Plumbers, electricians, exterminators, landscaping, private security, and others providing services necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and operation of residences, essential activities, and essential businesses
  • Businesses providing mailing and shipping services, including post office boxes
  • Educational institutions—including public and private K-12 schools, colleges, and universities—for purposes of facilitating distance learning or performing essential functions, provided that social distancing of 6 feet per person is maintained to the greatest extent possible
  • Schools and other entities that typically provide food services to students or members of the public may continue to do so under this order on the condition that the food is provided to students or members of the public on a pick-up and take-away basis only
  • Laundromats, dry cleaners, and laundry service providers
  • Restaurants and other facilities that prepare and serve food, but only for drive-thru, delivery, or carry out
  • Businesses that supply products needed for people to work from home, including telecom services
  • Businesses that supply other essential businesses with the support or supplies necessary to operate, including tech support, signage, and storage
  • Businesses that ship or deliver food or goods directly to residences
  • Airlines, taxis, rail, and others providing transportation services necessary for essential activities and other purposes expressly authorized in the order
  • Home-based care for seniors, adults, or children
  • Residential facilities and shelters for seniors, adults, and children
  • Businesses that provide pet care, including animal shelters and boarding facilities
  • Professional services, such as legal or accounting services, when necessary to assist with legally mandated activities; or to exercise constitutional rights, including but not limited to obligations under any court rule or order and for activities of essential businesses
  • Businesses that offer childcare services, but only to the extent that they provide services to people who are necessary employees of essential businesses and government functions, and provided that they take reasonable actions to comply with social distancing conditions

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


March 31, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

Late on 3/30/2020, St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) received notification of a death of a 50-59 year old female with chronic medical conditions. This is the third death in St. Louis County.

DPH has been closely monitoring this outbreak and has done so with the limitations in our public health and healthcare systems’ capacity to obtain notifications as rapidly as we would like. The healthcare community is working together to ensure the most expeditious notification processes.

Moving forward, DPH will require any laboratory company or healthcare provider who receives a positive test result for COVID-19 to report that finding to DPH immediately, but not later than six hours after notification of the result. Additionally, healthcare providers will be required to report a death, if that death is caused by or from complications of COVID-19, to DPH immediately, but not later than twenty-four hours after the time of such death.

These changes should expedite the process and minimize confusion, while continuing to provide the public with the best information available.

Daily Briefs

As these daily briefs are no longer dependent on receiving statistical information later in the day, they will be provided earlier, with the goal of 11:30 AM.

We will attempt to focus efforts on providing emerging information, noteworthy trends, or other remarkable topics.

Dashboard

The dashboard located at www.stlcorona.com has a tab labeled “Educational Materials.” That folder contains a wealth of information. Please use, distribute, and share the information as widely as possible. The more people that consume it, the more lives that can potentially be saved. There is basic information, cleaning recommendations, stress and coping literature, and information for those individuals and professions that will be most impacted by COVID-19.

Contact Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information.


March 30, 2020

Please Click Here to view COVID19 statistics and education.

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

The St. Louis County Department of Public Health will continue to be versatile in its response to COVID-19. We are striving to provide easy access to important information, statistics, testing criteria, and contact information to those in St. Louis County. To achieve that end, a new dashboard has been created and can be accessed from www.stlcorona.com. This page will enable and empower our community to make informed decisions and stay up-to-date as this pandemic evolves.

Moving forward, the daily updates pertaining to COVID-19 that are provided by the St. Louis County Department of Public Health will look slightly different. They will focus more on educational/informational materials, that will likely support trends, emerging information, or other topics that need more of a focus. Numbers associated with positive cases, calls for service, and other data will no longer be provided in these updates. Instead, they will be displayed in the easily accessible dashboard.

Dashboard is linked above on this page. We are confident that it will be a tremendous resource moving forward and will provide a user-friendly experience.

 

Daily Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information available.


March 29, 2020

Please Click Here to view COVID19 statistics and education.

Severe Illness is Associated with Using Non-Pharmaceutical Chloroquine Phosphate to Prevent and Treat COVID-19.

Chloroquine phosphate, when used without a prescription and supervision of a healthcare provider, can cause serious health consequences, including death.

  • Do not ingest aquarium use products or any other chemicals that contain chloroquine phosphate. These chemicals are not intended for human consumption and can lead to serious health consequences, including death.
  • Medications like chloroquine, and the related compound hydroxychloroquine, should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider as prescribed medications. They should only be used according to the instructions provided.
  • Seek immediate medical attention if you are experiencing any unexpected symptoms after taking chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine by contacting your healthcare provider or your poison center.

Donations of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Needed:

Due to the national and global span of the current pandemic, the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) is not adequately meeting the demand. Thus, the St. Louis County Police Office of Emergency Management is seeking immediate assistance in gathering PPE.

To be clear, area first responders have PPE at this time. This is a forward-thinking decision that will ensure area first responders have the necessary equipment for the duration of the pandemic.

If you or your organization is able to provide this equipment, email [email protected]. Officials will respond and coordinate pick-up from any location in the area, state, or Midwest region. For the safety of our responders, we cannot currently accept used equipment, food, drink, open packages, or homemade items. Items currently needed include: surgical masks, nitrile gloves (latex free), safety glasses, sanitizing wipes, N-95 masks, medical gowns, goggles, face shields, disposable coveralls, hand sanitizer, and booties.

 

Daily Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information available.


March 28, 2020

As of 2:00 PM on 3/28/2020, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • Two deaths
  • 291 total positive cases, an increase of 70 new positive cases from yesterday’s 221.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 259 calls on 3/27/2020. This is a fair decrease from the 347 calls fielded on 3/26/2020

We acknowledge that although the laboratory test is becoming more broadly available, there are limitations in our public health and healthcare systems’ capacity to obtain samples from people as rapidly as we would like. The healthcare community is working together to assure equitable access to COVID-19 testing resources in the St. Louis region.

We are evaluating the possibility of providing this media advisory earlier in the day. The reporting process(es) involved at the State and local levels are not always consistent. This results in differing numbers at differing times and ultimately confusion. We acknowledge this and are working the best we possibly can under the circumstances.

Smokers are More Vulnerable to COVID-19

As the act of smoking requires an individual’s fingers and a potentially contaminated cigarette to be in contact with their lips, it increases the possibility of the virus being transmitted from hand to mouth. Additionally, there is a great increase in risk of serious illness for those with lung disease or reduced lung capacity.

The same principles apply to any tobacco product, including, but not limited to, cigars, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

Wellness and Mental Health

The outbreak of COVID-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. How you respond to the outbreak can depend on your background, the things that make you different from other people, and the community you live in.

Here are some things you can do to support yourself:

  • Take breaks from watching, reading, or listening to news stories, including social media.
  • Take care of your body, take deep breaths and stretch.
  • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals, exercise regularly and get plenty of sleep.
  • Make time to unwind. Try to do some other activities you enjoy.
  • Connect with others. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.

Call your healthcare provider if stress gets in the way of your daily activities for several days in a row. You can also contact the Missouri Crisis Line for help at 1-888-761-4357 or text “HAND” to 839863.

 

Daily Information

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services hotline can be reached at (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County has created a website dedicated to the dissemination of information relating to COVID-19, www.stlcorona.com. Please visit that website or those belonging to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) or the World Health Organization (WHO) for the most current and reputable information available.


 

March 27, 2020

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update

As of 12:00 AM on 3/27/2020, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • Two deaths.
  • 221 total positive cases, an increase of 78 new positive cases from yesterday’s 143.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 347 calls on 3/26/2020. This is a slight decrease from the 368 calls fielded on 3/25/2020.

We acknowledge that although the laboratory test is becoming more broadly available, there are limitations in our public health and healthcare systems’ capacity to obtain samples from people as rapidly as we would like. The healthcare community is working together to assure equitable access to COVID-19 testing resources in the St. Louis region.

We are evaluating the possibility of providing this media advisory earlier in the day. The reporting process(es) involved at the State and local levels are not always consistent. This results in differing numbers at differing times and ultimately confusion. We acknowledge this and are working the best we possibly can under the circumstances.

Elderly: Some of the Most Vulnerable for Different Reasons

High Risk – Those 60 years of age and older are in the “high risk” category for COVID-19. It is recommended that they:

  • Cancel any and all non-essential travel.
  • Have plenty of nonperishable foods and household goods on hand.
  • Identify a friend or family member who can run errands. (Call 211 for assistance from the United Way.)
  • Make a back-up plan for caretakers in the event they get sick.
  • Be aware of their emotional health.
  • Stay in touch with loved ones by phone and email.
  • Visit cdc.gov for more safety tips.

Criminal Activity – Schemes on vulnerable populations, including the elderly, have the potential to rise as this pandemic continues. Fake promises of protective medical equipment, stories of grandchildren needing immediate money for healthcare, and false charities claiming to help the coronavirus response are all examples of these frauds.

Other known COVID-19 scams could include:

  • Investment scams, “get rich” or “recover your money” quick schemes.
  • Romance scams, particularly with the increased use of on-line dating services.
  • Phishing emails, texts or phone calls, claiming to be from government or helping agencies.
  • Inflated or false funeral pricing or scams relating to debts of deceased individuals.
  • Fraudulent COVID related services.

Residents are encouraged to never allow someone to pressure them in to making an immediate decision about money. Take the time necessary to research the company or cause to make certain they are a reputable organization and talk to a trusted friend or family member before making these financial decisions.

If you know of a COVID‐19 scam or price gouging, please alert the Missouri Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection Hotline at 1-800-392-8222. If you are aware of an older or disabled adult who may be subject to bullying, abuse, neglect or exploitation, call the Missouri Adult Abuse Hotline at 1-800-392-0210.

The St. Louis County Police Department also stands ready to serve. Please contact the Bureau of Communications or your local precinct.

Donations of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Needed:

Due to the national and global span of the current pandemic, the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) is not adequately meeting the demand. Thus, the St. Louis County Police Office of Emergency Management is seeking immediate assistance in gathering PPE.

To be clear, area first responders have PPE at this time. This is a forward-thinking decision that will ensure area first responders have the necessary equipment for the duration of the pandemic.

If you or your organization is able to provide this equipment, email [email protected] Officials will respond and coordinate pick-up from any location in the area, state, or Midwest region. For the safety of our responders, we cannot currently accept used equipment, food, drink, open packages, or homemade items.

Items currently needed are:

  • Surgical masks
  • Nitrile gloves (latex free)
  • Safety glasses
  • Sanitizing wipes
  • N-95 Masks
  • Medical gowns
  • Goggles
  • Face shields
  • Disposable coveralls
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Booties

March 26, 2020

As of 12:00 AM on 3/26/2020, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • Two deaths. Today, DPH received notification of a death of a 80-89 female with chronic medical conditions.
  • 143 total positive cases, an increase of 24 new positive cases from yesterday’s 119.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 368 calls on 3/25/2020. This is a decrease from the 604 calls fielded on 3/24/2020.

We acknowledge that although the laboratory test is becoming more broadly available, there are limitations in our public health and healthcare systems’ capacity to obtain samples from people as rapidly as we would like. The healthcare community is working together to assure equitable access to COVID-19 testing resources in the St. Louis region.

Criteria for testing include:

Symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (fever, cough, lower respiratory symptoms)

AND

  • Hospitalized/critically ill patients
  • People living in congregate settings
  • Those at high risk for poorer outcomes including those >60 and people with chronic medical conditions
  • Close contact to those with known COVID-19 infection
  • Healthcare workers

Testing is focused on those who are the most ill or most at risk in our community because they will benefit most from the testing.

If you are ill, whether you test positive or negative, your healthcare provider’s advice for managing your symptoms will be the same. Currently, anyone with a fever and cough should assume their illness could be COVID-19 and take steps to protect others in the community and household from the disease. If you are sick, you need to stay home and stay away from other people in your home. If you need to go into public to visit a healthcare provider, wear a mask and practice meticulous hand washing.

Testing locations and current screening process information can be found at www.stlcorona.com and:

North County – (314) 653-5000
Mid County – (314) 747-3000
West County – (314) 251-0500
South County – (314) 966-9666

Additionally, all SSM Health area hospitals can be reached for testing information at www.ssmhealth.com/covid19.

Close contact is defined as: (A) being within approximately 6 feet of a COVID-19 case for a prolonged period of time; close contact can occur while caring for, living with, visiting, or sharing a healthcare waiting area or room with a COVID-19 case – or(B) having direct contact with infectious secretions of a COVID-19 case (e.g., being coughed or sneezed on)


March 25, 2020

Today, as of 5:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • One death
  • 119 total positive cases, an increase of 22 new positive cases from yesterday’s 97.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 604 calls on 3/24/2020. This marks a decrease from the 885 calls fielded on 3/23/2020.

As a reminder, the manner in which the numbers has changed to streamline the process. The practice should bring local health departments to a consistent level of the timing and reporting of the numbers. Furthermore, it is important to understand the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

Risk

It is important to understand that everyone is at risk of contracting COVID-19. This pandemic will affect all people, regardless of age, sex, race, or health conditions. The CDC identified that “the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.”

According to the CDC, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness. However to date, data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk
  • Other high-risk conditions could include:
    • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
    • People who have serious heart conditions
    • People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
    • People of any age with severe obesity or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not /well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk

Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications

Testing Locations and Instructions

Filters are in place to ensure an expedited testing process for those that meet the necessary criteria. Citizens must call prior to arriving at any testing facility. This is to ensure that individuals are filtered to the next step, if any, appropriately. An operator will transfer them to a screener to get authorization for testing and provide further instruction.

Phone numbers are associated with physical location of that citizen. A map attached to this email displays this. Those numbers are:

North County – (314) 653-5000
Mid County – (314) 747-3000
West County – (314) 251-0500
South County – (314) 966-9666

Additionally, all SSM Health area hospitals can be reached for testing information at www.ssmhealth.com/covid19

These processes are in place to ensure that medical professionals, facilities, and supplies are not inundated and exhausted unnecessarily. Furthermore, it reduces the time and manner that people that potentially have COVID-19 are in public.


March 24, 2020

Today, as of 5:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • One death
  • 97 total positive cases, an increase of seven new positive cases from yesterday’s 90.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 885 calls on 3/23/2020. This marks a significant increase of the 396 calls fielded on 3/22/2020.

We should not take solace in the fact that only seven new cases are being reported today. The manner in which the numbers will be reported moving forward is changing to streamline the process. The practice will bring local health departments to a consistent level of the timing and reporting of the numbers. Today, 3/24/2020, should be the first and only day this issue occurs.

Due to the volume of results now available, the ability to provide data on each positive case has diminished.

Testing Locations and Instructions

Filters are in place to ensure an expedited testing process for those that meet the necessary criteria. Citizens must call prior to arriving at any testing facility. This is to ensure that individuals are filtered to the next step, if any, appropriately. An operator will transfer them to a screener to get authorization for testing and provide further instruction.

Phone numbers are associated with physical location of that citizen. A map attached to this email displays this. Those numbers are:

North County – (314) 653-5000
Mid County – (314) 747-3000
West County – (314) 251-0500
South County – (314) 966-9666

 

Additionally, all SSM Health area hospitals can be reached for testing information at www.ssmhealth.com/covid19.

These processes are in place to ensure that medical professionals, facilities, and supplies are not inundated and exhausted unnecessarily. Furthermore, it reduces the time and manner that people that potentially have COVID-19 are in public.

New Criteria for Testing

The criteria for testing has changed as a result of this pandemic evolving. The new testing criteria is less focused on travel and more focused on symptoms. This is a consequence of clear evidence of community transmission being present in St. Louis County. The criteria now requires:

  • Close contact of a COVID patient WITH symptoms.
  • High risk (age or underlying medical condition) WITH symptoms.
  • Hospitalized WITH symptoms.

Please note that each of those require symptoms. Again, symptoms are fever, cough, and shortness of breath.


March 23, 2020

Today, as of 5:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • One death
  • 90 total positive cases, an increase of 35 new positive cases from yesterday’s 55
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 396 calls on 3/22/2020.

Due to the volume of results now available, the ability to provide data on each positive case has diminished. It is unlikely that we will be able to provide age ranges for those testing positive for COVID-19 on a daily basis with a short turnaround. We are evaluating the most appropriate and realistic way to proceed to continue to provide the public with the best information possible.

Epidemiological investigations indicate there is clear evidence of community transmission in St. Louis County.

Testing Locations and Instructions

Testing facilities are located in North, South, West, and Central St. Louis County. Please know that DPH will work with testing partners to ensure that testing services are available to the uninsured and will further work to address potential cost barriers to such services.

While we cannot disclose the specific locations of those sites at this time due to the facilities being privately run, St. Louis County Department of Public Health’s COVID-19 hotline is available countywide to everyone and anyone. Anyone experiencing symptoms such as fever, shortness of breath, and coughing, should be encouraged to call our hotline at (314) 615-2660. Those with general questions regarding COVID-19 should call (877) 435-8411.

St. Louis County to Enact Stay at Home Orders to Prevent Spread of COVID-19

County Executive Dr. Sam Page announced on March 21, 2020, that St. Louis County and the City of St. Louis will be adopting new restrictions to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the region. The new restrictions took effect on Monday, March 23, 2020, at 12:01 AM and will end on April 22, 2020, at 11:59 PM. This ensures that residents can meet their basic needs and essential services will still be provided. The restrictions will require people to stay at home when possible. This announcement will not affect the ability of residents to go to the grocery store, the pharmacy, and take a walk in a public park. The Stay at Home Orders were enacted to prevent the spread of this pandemic.


March 22, 2020

Epidemiological investigations indicate there is clear evidence of community transmission in St. Louis County.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), “community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.”

Today, as of 5:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • One death
  • 55 total positive cases.
The following 38 additional cases confirmed:
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 30-39 years of age – not travel-related
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age – not travel-related
  • 30-39 years of age – not travel-related
  • 20-29 years of age – not travel-related
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 60-69 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 40-49 years of age
  • 30-39 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age – not travel-related
  • 50-59 years of age – not travel-related
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 50-52 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 50-53 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 20-29 years of age
  • 10-19 years of age
  • 40-49 years of age
  • 40-49 years of age
  • 50-59 years of age
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 330 calls on 3/21/2020.

Due to the potential volume of results becoming available, the ability to provide data on each positive case will likely diminish moving forward

As anticipated, the ability to provide reliable statistics pertaining to pending tests or tests sent for analysis has significantly diminished. This is an encouraging step as more people are being tested by more health care professionals; however, it has an adverse effect on the accuracy of the numbers. Additionally, the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

 

St. Louis County to Enact Stay at Home Orders to Prevent Spread of COVID-19

County Executive Dr. Sam Page announced on March 21, 2020, that St. Louis County and the City of St. Louis will be adopting new restrictions to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the region. The new restrictions will take effect on Monday, March 23, 2020, at 12:01 AM and will end on April 22, 2020, at 11:59 PM. This will ensure that residents can meet their basic needs and essential services will still be provided. The new restrictions will require people to stay at home when possible. It is just as important to recognize what is not impacted by this as what is. This announcement will not affect the ability of residents to go to the grocery store, the pharmacy, and take a walk in a public park.

The Stay at Home Orders were enacted to prevent the spread of this pandemic.

Domestic Travelers (Including those returning from Spring Break)

Information regarding the spread of COVID-19 within the United States is constantly evolving and areas of domestic travel are being scrutinized. The CDC does not generally issue advisories or restrictions for travel within the United States. However, cases have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Crowded travel settings, like airports, festivals, parties, or concerts may increase chances of getting COVID-19.

There are several things you should consider if you have traveled domestically. Consider the risk of passing COVID-19 to others, particularly if you will be in close contact with people who are older adults or have severe chronic health condition These people are at higher risk of getting very sick. If your symptoms are mild or you don’t have a fever, you may not realize you are infectious.

 

The following states have been identified as Areas of Community Transmission. Please follow the guidance provided by the CDC if you have traveled or intend on traveling to any of these states:

United States
Arkansas, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, Wyoming

For Illinois:
Individuals who travel to Illinois and stay overnight. This does not include individuals who live in Illinois and who commute for work to St. Louis.


March 21, 2020

Today, as of 5:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • One death.
  • 17 total positive cases. (One case previously identified as St. Louis County has been re-located out of state.)
  • The following eight additional cases confirmed:
    • 20-29 years of age, travel-related
    • 50-59 years of age, unknown origin
    • 30-39 years of age, unknown origin
    • 40-49 years of age, unknown origin
    • 50-59 years of age, unknown origin
    • 40-49 years of age, unknown origin
    • 30-39 years of age, unknown origin
    • 40-49 years of age, unknown origin
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 413 calls on 3/20/2020.

As anticipated, the ability to provide reliable statistics pertaining to pending tests or tests sent for analysis has significantly diminished. This is an encouraging step as more people are being tested by more health care professionals; however, it has an adverse effect on the accuracy of the numbers. Additionally, the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

St. Louis County to Enact Stay at Home Orders to Prevent Spread of COVID-19

County Executive Dr. Sam Page announced today, March 21, 2020, that St. Louis County and the City of St. Louis will be adopting new restrictions to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the region. The new restrictions will take effect on Monday, March 23, 2020, at 12:01 AM. This will ensure that residents can meet their basic needs and essential services will still be provided. The new restrictions will require people to stay at home when possible.

It is just as important to recognize what is not impacted by this as what is. This announcement will not affect the ability of residents to go to the grocery store, the pharmacy, and take a walk in a public park.

Suggestions to Prepare for Home Stays

  • Consider and plan for those in your home who are considered vulnerable (those over age 60, anyone with a serious medical condition).
  • Create a contact list with phone numbers of neighbors, schools, and employers.
  • Set up online shopping accounts if possible.
  • Plan ahead and think about what you will need in order to stay at home for an extended period of time. Think ahead and plan how you will keep enough food and medications in your home during this period.

Have Supplies on Hand

Buy only as much as you need to avoid frequent shopping trips. It is not necessary to buy these items in bulk. Stores selling necessary items like grocery stores, pharmacies, gas stations, and hardware stores will remain open, but we encourage residents to shop less often in order to spend less time in public. Supplies on hand should include:

  • Non-perishable food
  • First aid kit including thermometer
  • Medications (over the counter and prescription)
  • Toilet paper and other personal hygiene items
  • Cleaning supplies (antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer, disinfecting wipes, etc.)

March 20, 2020

Today, as of 6:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • A woman, 60-69 years of age, with underlying health conditions, is the first COVID-19 related death in St. Louis County. The positive test result was received on 3/17/2020.
  • Ten total positive cases.
  • 49 tests have returned negative results.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 612 calls on 3/19/2020.

As anticipated, the ability to provide reliable statistics pertaining to pending tests or tests sent for analysis has significantly diminished. This is an encouraging step as more people are being tested by more health care professionals; however, it has an adverse effect on the accuracy of the numbers. Additionally, the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

Text Message Alerts

St. Louis County will provide text message alerts to keep the community updated on COVID-19. “Increasing access to information as this issue quickly evolves is crucial. Text message alerts are just another way to do that in addition to our website, stlcorona.com, which is updated daily,” said County Executive Sam Page.

To receive alerts, text: STLOUISCOALERT to 67283

To stop receiving alerts, text: STOP STLOUISCOALERT to 67283

Areas of Community Transmission

An area of community transmission is described as areas that have experienced community spread of COVID-19.

The following States and Counties have been identified as Areas of Community Transmission. Pleas follow the guidance provided by the CDC if you have traveled or intend on traveling to any of these States: California, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, South Carolina, Washington, Wyoming, Colorado - Eagle, Summit, Pitkin, and Gunnison Counties

This list is available at www.stlcorona.com.

Domestic Travelers (Including those returning from Spring Break)

Information regarding the spread of COVID-19 within the United States is constantly evolving and areas of domestic travel are being scrutinized. The CDC does not generally issue advisories or restrictions for travel within the United States. However, cases have been reported in many states, and some areas are experiencing community spread of the disease. Crowded travel settings, like airports, festivals, parties, or concerts may increase chances of getting COVID-19.

There are several things you should consider if you have traveled domestically. Consider the risk of passing COVID-19 to others, particularly if you will be in close contact with people who are older adults or have severe chronic health condition These people are at higher risk of getting very sick. If your symptoms are mild or you don’t have a fever, you may not realize you are infectious.

  • Is COVID-19 spreading in the area where have been?
  • Have you been in close contact with others during your trip?
  • Has your work or school told you to stay home for 14 days for self-monitoring after traveling?
  • Do you live with someone who is older or has a serious, chronic medical condition?

To be safe when returning home, you can follow these steps to be a responsible member of the community and reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 onto others.

  • Stay at home. Do not go to work, school, or leave your house for 14 days. Discuss your work situation with your employer.
  • Monitor your health. Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day and monitor for fever (temperature of 100.4°F/38°C or higher). Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
  • Practice social distancing within the home. Avoid contact with other people for the 14 days. Maintain distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from family members and others in the home when possible.

March 19, 2020

Today, as of 3:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • Ten total positive cases.
  • The following five additional cases confirmed today are still under investigation to determine origin:
    • 6th Case: 60-69 years old
    • 7th Case: 30-39 years old
    • 8th Case: 50-59 years old
    • 9th Case: 80-89 years old
    • 10th Case: 50-59 years old
  • 38 tests have returned negative results.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 652 calls on 3/18/2020.

As anticipated, the ability to provide reliable statistics pertaining to pending tests or tests sent for analysis has significantly diminished. This is an encouraging step as more people are being tested by more health care professionals; however, it has an adverse effect on the accuracy of the numbers. Additionally, the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

Disinfecting Details Regarding COVID-19

The virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is stable for several hours to days in aerosols and on surfaces, according to a new study from National Institutes of Health. The scientists found that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to 72 hours on plastic and stainless steel. The results provide key information about the stability of SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19 disease, and suggests that people may acquire the virus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. This testing is considered preliminary at this point and has not been peer reviewed. This is not meant to invoke fear, but to assist our community in taking every possible precaution in spreading this virus.

Knowledge is power and knowing that information continues to change and this public health crisis evolves.


March 18, 2020

Today, as of 3:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • Five positive cases. The confirmed case today is a 30-40 year old and it is travel related. The nature of the travel, whether domestic or international, is still under investigation.
  • 32 tests have returned negative results.
  • The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 648 calls on 3/17/2020.

As anticipated, the ability to provide reliable statistics pertaining to pending tests or tests sent for analysis has significantly diminished. This is an encouraging step as more people are being tested by more health care professionals; however, it has an adverse effect on the accuracy of the numbers. Additionally, the statistics provided are not reflective of the epidemic, rather they are reflective of the information now available.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

Social Distancing – Quarantine - Isolation

Understanding the differences in social distancing, quarantine, and isolation is vital to the educating the public as we continue to face uncertainty.

Social distancing should be used by those who are not sick when in public or at work. The goal of social distancing is to reduce face-to-face contact and reduce the spread of the disease.

 

Quarantine should be used by people who may have been exposed but are not sick. The person could have the virus in their body even if they do not have symptoms. They need to stay away from others until they find out definitively.

 

Isolation is used for people suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19. The goal of this is to keep the person from infecting others.


March 17, 2020

Today, as of 3:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • 11 tests with pending results.
  • Three tests were sent 3/16/2020 and six thus far on 3/17/2020.
  • 27 tests have returned negative results.
  • Three positive cases (3/7/2020, 3/13/2020, 3/16/2020).

Please note that these tests only reflect those conducted at the State Public Health Laboratory. The availability and accessibility of commercial labs has and will continue to affect the reliability of the actual numbers.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

The St. Louis County Department of Health fielded a total of 695 calls on 3/16/2020.

Coping with Social Distancing

The constant media coverage of the outbreak of COVID-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about an infectious disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Successfully coping with stress in a healthy way will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. Healthy alternatives to help cope with this stress while still practicing social distancing include the following:

  • Maintain a routine. Try to maintain a regular meal and sleep schedule while practicing social distancing. The regular schedule can help to reduce stress and fear of the unknown.
  • Go for a walk or exercise at home. Try to go out into nature as much as possible for the benefits of Vitamin D (sunlight). If you cannot get out of the house, most streaming services offer exercise and yoga classes.
  • Do not indulge in binging. Binging in eating, alcohol or drug use and even television and oversleeping are all unhealthy habits.
  • We can all use this time to do some spring cleaning and decluttering. On top of increasing anxiety, household clutter can harbor infections, pollutants, and create unhygienic spaces.
  • Be a better friend/relative. Take the time to run through your contacts and reach out to those people that you haven’t spoken to in a while. Offer to help out a friend or neighbor who may be less mobile. Pick up groceries or needed prescriptions.
  • Learn something new. Take an online class, research a topic that interests you, or watch “how-to” or “DIY” videos for the project that you have been meaning to finish.

March 16, 2020

Today, as of 3:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • 14 tests with pending results.
  • Four tests were sent 3/15/2020 and three thus far on 3/16/2020.
  • 19 tests have returned negative results.
  • Two positive cases, one reported on 3/7/2020 and one reported on 3/13/2020.

Please note that these tests only reflect those conducted at the State Public Health Laboratory. The availability and accessibility of commercial labs has and will continue to affect the reliability of the actual numbers.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

Mental Health: Managing Anxiety and Stress

The outbreak of COVID-19 may be stressful for people. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger. Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations.

Stress during an infectious disease outbreak can include:

  • Fear and worry about your own health and the health of your loved ones
  • Changes in sleep or eating patterns
  • Difficulty sleeping or concentrating
  • Worsening of chronic health problems
  • Increased use of alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs

There are many things you can do to support your child during this time, as they may be influenced by inaccurate or false information.

  • Take time to talk with your child or teen about the COVID-19 outbreak. Answer questions and share facts about COVID-19 in a way that your child or teen can understand.
  • Reassure your child or teen that they are safe. Let them know it is ok if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Limit your family’s exposure to news coverage of the event, including social media. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Try to keep up with regular routines and with schools closed, create a schedule for learning activities and relaxing or fun activities.
  • Be a role model. Take breaks, get plenty of sleep, exercise, and eat well. Also, consider connecting with your friends and family members virtually.

March 15, 2020

From County Executive Dr. Sam Page

Tonight I am amending my executive order to limit crowd sizes to 50 people. This decision is based on CDC guidance and was made in coordination with other regional leaders.

From St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson

Effective immediately and for the next eight weeks, all scheduled events and social gatherings with more than 50 people in attendance are prohibited in St. Louis, St. Louis County, St. Charles County, Madison County, IL & St. Clair County, IL as recommended by the CDC.


March 15, 2020

Today, as of 3:30 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • 11 tests with pending results.
  • Two tests sent 3/14/2020 and four thus far on 3/15/2020.
  • 19 tests have returned negative results.
  • Two positive cases, one reported on 3/7/2020 and one reported on 3/13/2020.

As of March 14th, all presumed positive tests will be considered confirmed positive. The Missouri State Laboratory will no longer require presumed positive tests be sent to the Centers for Disease Control for that additional level of confirmation.

Think Family First

As this event continues to rapidly evolve, please think family first and consider day to day activities, routines and schedules that may be impacted by significant closures, cancellations or limited activity. The following suggestions are simply to provide additional planning measures that may be needed in the future.

  • Create a household plan of action in case of illness in the household or disruption of daily activities due to COVID-19 in the community.
  • Consider getting a two-week supply of prescription and over the counter medications, food and other essentials to keep at home. Know how to get food delivered if possible.
  • Establish ways to communicate with others in a virtual capacity (e.g., family, friends, co-workers).
  • Establish plans to telework, what to do about child care needs, and how to adapt to cancellation of events.
  • Know about emergency operations plans for schools/workplaces of household members.

“It is likely that everyday life will continue to be affected by the challenges presented by COVID-19,” Co-Director Spring Schmidt said. “We believe these difficult, but proactive, decisions will reduce the impact this virus will have on our community and all those in it.”

Continue to Practice Social Distancing

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines social distancing as “remaining out of congregate settings, avoiding mass gatherings, and maintaining distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from others when possible.” The main goal of social distancing is to “flatten the curve,” which refers to reducing the peak number of cases at any one time during the outbreak. By flattening the curve through effective public health measures, the number of people simultaneously infected will be much lower than if no measures were taken.


March 14, 2020

Today, as of 3:00 PM, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health (DPH) has:

  • 13 tests with pending results.
  • Ten tests sent 3/13/2020 and two thus far on 3/14/2020.
  • Nine tests have returned negative results.
  • One presumptive positive case was initially reported on 3/13/2020.
  • One positive case confirmed by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) as was initially reported on 3/7/2020. 

“As community testing is expected to expand rapidly in the next several days, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health will only be able to reliably provide numbers on presumptive and confirmed cases,” Acting Director Spring Schmidt said. “We will provide more detailed information for as long as the number is an accurate reflection of what is happening in St. Louis County.”

St. Louis County Establishes Technical Specialists Team

St. Louis County is building a team of experts to work closely with the Department of Health to review and draft policies that allow the county to remain at the forefront of fighting the coronavirus. Among those on the new Technical Specialists Team are Rob Gatter, a professor of health management and policy at St. Louis University, and Jason Purnell, an associate professor at the Washington University’s Brown School.

“Our community is filled with tremendous talent. With the coronavirus, we must tap into that talent,” said County Executive Sam Page. “As we continue to assemble this team, I thank each member for devoting their expertise to this public health challenge.”


March 13, 2020

Update from the County Executive

Executive Order from Dr. Sam Page
Effective starting 5 PM on Friday, March 13, 2020

It is hereby declared unlawful for any person to organize or to attend an intentional gathering of 250 people or more in a single space or room. It is further provided that any person who organizes a gather of 249 people or less shall take appropriate action to minimize risk to the greatest extent possible by implementing and enforcing mitigation measures, including but not limited to social distancing, limiting the time period of gatherings, cleaning of all surfaces, and posting of signs. It is further declared unlawful for any person to organize or to attend an intentional gathering of more than 10 individuals of high-risk groups as that term may be defined by the Director of Department of Public Health. This paragraph shall not apply to school attendance, places of employment, grocery stores, retail stores, or any activity that a court of competent jurisdiction holds cannot constitutionally be closed in these specific circumstances.

View the full order here.


March 7, 2020

Governor Parson and St. Louis County Executive Dr. Sam Page held a joint press conference to discuss the first presumptive positive case of COVID-19 in Missouri. The CDC confirmed that this is a case of COVID-19 on Tuesday, March 10th.

Watch the press conference here.


Dr. Page answers FAQs about the new coronavirus and COVID-19

 

What is COVID-19? What is a coronavirus?

  • COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.
  • Coronaviruses are a large family of respiratory viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. In humans, these range from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19. 

Should I worry about COVID-19?

  • If you have not travelled from one of the areas currently flagged by the CDC or have not been in close contact with someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 and is feeling unwell, the immediate risk of being exposed to the virus causing COVID-19 is thought to be low. It is important that St. Louis County residents pay attention to the Department of Public Health and CDC updates for latest information. View the current list of countries with travel restrictions or travel notices here. 
  • Most people recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Some patients who get COVID-19 become seriously ill and develop difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. Few of the reported cases have resulted in a death. People with fever, cough, difficulty breathing, and a reason to believe they’ve been exposed should seek medical attention.

What are the symptoms?

  • COVID-19 symptoms closely resemble other respiratory illnesses. Symptoms include cough, fever, runny rose, sore throat, and tiredness. Less commonly, people have reported aches and pains or diarrhea. 

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • COVID-19 spreads from person-to-person through close contact (within six feet). The virus spreads from person-to-person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 sneezes, coughs, or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then contract COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also contract COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. It is important to stay more than 6 feet away from a person who is sick.
  • The risk of catching COVID-19 from someone with no symptoms appears to be low; people are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic, or the sickest.
  • Many people with COVID-19 experience only mild symptoms. This is particularly true at the early stages of the disease. It is therefore possible to catch COVID-19 from someone who has, for example, just a mild cough and does not feel ill.

What can I do to protect myself? 

  • It is important that everyone take steps to reduce the spread of COVID-19, especially to protect those who are vulnerable. Steps you take to prevent spread of flu and the common cold will also help prevent coronavirus.
  • These steps are:
    1. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating and after eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. Be sure to dry your hands completely.
    2. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
    •  
  • Keep unwashed hands away from your face, nose, and eyes. 
  • Stay away from people who are ill.
  • Stay home while you are sick and avoid close contact with others.
  • When you sneeze or cough, cover your cough or sneeze with your sleeve or a tissue; then, throw away the tissue.
  • Follow advice from your health care provider.
  • Clean commonly touched surfaces regularly. View the CDC’s guidance on cleaning surfaces here.  
  • Stay informed on the latest updates through trusted sources only.

I have respiratory or flu symptoms. What should I do? 

  • Call your doctor’s office or local clinic
  • Monitor your symptoms
  • Avoid sharing personal household items
  • Your doctor may recommend self-quarantine or isolation, be prepared in advance, should these be necessary.

How do self-quarantine and isolation work? 

  • You may be asked to be in self-quarantine whether you have symptoms of illness or not. If you have symptoms, you should distance yourself from all social activities and others in order to prevent the spread of any virus. You may also be asked to self-quarantine if you have been exposed to someone else who may be infected.
  • Self-quarantine is for people who have been exposed but do not have symptoms, they are asked to stay away from others in public settings. For 14 days from their last possible exposure, people in self-quarantine cannot go to work, school, or any public places where they could have close contact with others. Public health departments will direct them in how to monitor their health so that should they develop symptoms, they can be quickly and safely isolated from all others, including those in their household, and be connected to testing and care as needed.  Public health staff will remain in contact with you, if needed. 
  • For those who are showing symptoms and have contacted their doctor, isolation is the best course of action. Isolation is used for people who are currently ill, able to spread the disease, and need to stay away from others in order to avoid infecting them. Isolation may include from other family members as well in order to prevent the spread of the virus.
  • The CDC provides guidance for how to prepare if someone is isolated or quarantined in your home. View the CDC's recommendations here. 

How can I prepare for self-quarantine or isolation?

  • Follow the guidance of your health care provider.
  • Be sure you have enough food at home for at least 14 days.
  • To treat symptoms, have a supply of over-the-counter cold medications for at least 14 days.
  • If you regularly take prescription medication, arrange for a sufficient supply.
  • If you feel sick, monitor your symptoms and take your temperature twice a day.
  • Stay hydrated.
  • Have a supply of hygiene products like tissues, soap, hand sanitizer, and toilet paper.

What resources are available from St. Louis County? 

  • Guidance for the general public, churches, schools, businesses, and community organizations on how to prevent the spread of germs and diseases.
  • Regular updates on COVID-19 from the state and federal government.
  • Health education and promotional materials to help promote hand washing, Cover Your Cough, and other community messages.
  • Assistance with emergency planning and preparation.
  • Literature and information for vulnerable populations.
  • St. Louis County clinics can provide medical care to all County residents, regardless of ability to pay. Call 314-615-0500 if you do not have a doctor.

 

What drugs are most effective against COVID-19?

  • In order to manage symptoms, over-the-counter cold medicines are the most effective course of care.
  • Antibiotics do not work against viruses. COVID-19 is caused by a virus, so antibiotics do not work. Antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment of COVID-19; they only work on bacteria. Antibiotics should only be used as directed by a physician to treat a bacterial infection.
  • Prevention is the most effective course of action to combat COVID-19. Continue to practice vigorous and routine hand hygiene, cover your cough, and regularly disinfect commonly touched surfaces.

Is there a vaccine for COVID-19?

  • To date, there is not yet a vaccine and no specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-2019. However, those affected will receive care to relieve symptoms. People with serious illness should be hospitalized. Most patients recover thanks to supportive care.

Are novel coronavirus tests here in the St. Louis County? If so, how many?

 

  • The state is providing collection kits for St. Louis County, and the actual analysis would take place at the State Public Health Laboratory. We need to have permission from the state to submit those tests if we suspect someone may be infected. In addition, two commercial providers (Quest and Lab Corps) are now offered tests of their own, with approval from the FDA under emergency use authorization.

How are nurses, medical assistants and other health care workers being trained to protect themselves from any potential exposure?

  • These professionals should already be knowledgeable in infection prevention. Hospitals have their own dedicated infection prevention professionals who can provide training if needed. Other health professionals can seek additional education and consult the CDC guidance for health care professionals. View these CDC resources here.

What do I do if I don’t have health insurance or access to care?

  • We are currently working on a plan with area hospital systems. St. Louis County clinics can provide medical care to all County residents, regardless of ability to pay. Call 314-615-0500 if you do not have a doctor.

Is the County involved with the City of St. Louis in any preparation it may have?

  • We regularly coordinate and communicate with all our regional partners, including the City of St. Louis, across all aspects of our department and our efforts to educate and inform the public about COVID-19.

 

What is the role of the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) at this point?

  • On March 6th, St. Louis County partially activated our EOC in anticipation of the potential impact of COVID-19 in St. Louis County. The gradual activation includes bringing together at County’s EOC the following assets: the Department of Public Health, Office of Emergency Management, Public Information Officers, local Fire/EMS, and the St. Louis Medical Operations Center (SMOC), which is a coordinated and collaborative group of our local hospital systems. Other departments could become involved depending on how the novel coronavirus impacts St. Louis County.
  • The role of the EOC currently is to centralize communication between key stakeholders and coordinate our community education efforts.

Additional resources:

 

Contact the St. Louis County COVID-19 Hotline 24/7

314-615-2660

To receive text alerts when content is changed you can subscribe below: 

Text:

STLOUISCOALERT to 67283

 

COVID-19 Testing

North County
Christian Hospital Northeast
314-653-5000

Mid County
Barnes-Jewish Hospital
314-747-3000

West County
Mercy Hospital
mercy.net/covid19

South County
St. Luke’s Des Peres Hospital
314-966-9666

COVID-19 Information Resources
Areas of Community Transmission
County Executive Orders

Click on each button for more Excutive Order informtion:

State of Emergency - EO-10

 


Further Limits on the Size of Intentional Gatherings - EO-11

 


Policies Concerning Operational Adjustments, Employee Policies, and Access to Facilities - EO-12

 


Limits on Places of Public Accomodation - EO-13


Further Limits on Places of Public Accomodation - EO-14


Restrictions on Activities to Limit the Spread of COVID-19 - EO-15


Economic Rescue Team - EO-16

News